Hope and Resilience Award

Congratulations to Kristen who has won the Hope and Resilience Award!

Kristen has demonstrated a willingness to take risks related to vulnerability. In fact, she has embraced them and as a result achieved her personal goals and educated others by bravely sharingthe experiences of her journey towards increased wellness.

Kristen has been an invaluable member of the Buried in Treasures Workshop offered through CMHA’s CHPI program. She has completed the 12- week workshop successfully 3 times and is presently participating in her fourth round. Kristen’s meaningful contributions, willingness to lend a supportive ear and constant encouragement to her peers is invaluable. She is a natural leader who demonstrates immense compassion and understanding to those around her. She has not only established goals but she has accomplished them with determination and dedication.

In November of 2019, she presented her lived experience at the annual Community Homelessness Initiative Program conference hosted by CMHA & the City of Cornwall to an audience just shy of 200 people.

Kristen would like to acknowledge the continuous support of her husband Darren. Kristen would like it noted that her success would not have been possible without the supports of CMHA and specifically mentioned the supports received from Angée Bassett, Tammy Legros, Mark Snelgrove, Courtney King, Stacey Murphy and the Buried In Treasures Workshop.

 

CMHA recognizes World Mental Health Day 2020

On October 10, CMHA Champlain East will join international mental health organizations to celebrate World Mental Health Day.

World Mental Health Day is supported by the World Health Organization as an important way to raise awareness and advocate for better care for those with mental health issues worldwide. The theme this year is Mental Health for All: Greater Investment – Greater Access, to address the impact of COVID-19 on our mental health and to ensure no one is denied mental health care.

CMHA branches across the province provide a variety of mental health programs and services.

CMHA Ontario’s BounceBack program has developed a mental health tip sheet to support those who may be experiencing heightened mental health challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The tip sheet, titled 10 things you can do right now to reduce anxiety, stress, worry related to COVID-19, offers 10 quick and easy things anyone can do to alleviate mild-to-moderate symptoms of anxiety or depression at a time when these difficulties may be exacerbated. Tips include managing news consumption, challenging unhelpful thoughts, staying socially connected, helping others, spending time outdoors and more.

Further, CMHA Ontario has compiled a list of services available by branch during the pandemic, as well as a list of other provincial mental health supports.

 

CMHA recognizes World Homeless Day 2020

Housing with supports is key to recovery for many people living with mental health or addictions issues. This is one of the main messages that CMHA Champlain East is sharing with the community to mark World Homeless Day this October 10.

Evidence indicates that having a place to call home means a better quality of life and success in education and work. And housing with appropriate supports is shown to improve outcomes from even severe mental health and addictions problems.

CMHA supports the ‘Housing First’ model, a person-centred approach that provides immediate access to permanent housing for people experiencing homelessness, without requiring psychiatric treatment or sobriety as determinants of ‘housing readiness.’ Research on this approach shows that it reduces hospitalization and increases housing stability significantly more than treatment alone.

In partnership with other stakeholders, CMHAs continue their efforts to promote the need for housing in general and supportive housing in particular for people with lived experience of mental illness. CMHAs have called for increased investments in housing, as well as the need to reduce barriers to housing as one way to reduce the overall costs to health care, police and justice, and social services sectors.

For more information on World Homeless Day, visit their website.

 

Feeling low? Stressed? Anxious?

BounceBack can help. For those struggling with low mood, worry, stress, or mild to moderate depression or anxiety, you can look to the Canadian Mental Health Association’s (CMHA’s) free skill-building program BounceBack®: Reclaim your health. Through one-on-one telephone coaching and online videos offered in multiple languages, adults and youth 15+ learn skills to help manage worry and anxiety, combat unhelpful thinking and become more active and assertive – all from the comfort of their home.

To access the program, you will need a referral from a primary care provider (family doctor, nurse practitioner), psychiatrist, or client self-referral, so long as you’re connected with a primary care provider. Once a referral is submitted, you will be contacted by a BounceBack coach within five business days to conduct an information session about the program and ensure it’s the right fit.

While you wait for your telephone coaching sessions to begin, you can access our free online videos. These videos will provide you with practical tips on managing mood, sleeping better, problem-solving, and more. The videos are available in English, French, Arabic, Farsi, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Punjabi. To access the videos, visit bouncebackvideo.ca and enter this access code: bbtodayon.

When you’re ready for your telephone coaching sessions to begin, your BounceBack coach will support you as you work through a series of skill-building workbooks. You and your coach can choose from 20 workbook topics, 12 topics from shorter or condensed booklets, and nine topics from booklets geared to youth 15-18. Your coach is also there to provide you with motivation, monitor your progress and safety, and answer any questions. Coaches are extensively trained in the delivery of the program and are overseen by clinical psychologists. They also receive training in LGBTQ+ equity and trauma-informed care. The BounceBack program is also reviewed to ensure our processes and materials are culturally sensitive and inclusive. As coaches are not counsellors or therapists, your primary care provider will maintain responsibility for your overall care while you’re in the program.

To get started or to access our online referral form, visit: bouncebackontario.ca.

 

CMHA celebrates National Seniors Day 2020

CMHA Champlain East joins individuals and organizations across the country to celebrate National Seniors Day today.

National Seniors Day is an important time to celebrate the valuable contributions older adults make in communities across Ontario and reflect on the way they are supported. CMHA Champlain East is dedicated to supporting the well-being of all people throughout their lives, including an important focus on older people. Seniors are often undertreated for mental health problems, due to symptoms of mental health issues being mistaken for other conditions, discrimination and stigma, service availability, and physical and financial challenges.

Members of the public are encouraged to share their stories and use the #NationalSeniorsDay hashtag on social media.

 

Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Illness Awareness Week (#MIAW20) is Oct. 4-10, 2020 and the theme this year is “no health without mental health.” The week is led by the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH), a group of 13 national mental health organizations, including CMHA. We invite you to participate in CMHAEast local events:

Car Parade Cornwall

Car Parade Hawkesbury

 

There is a strong mental health case to be made for a universal basic income. It can actually protect mental health! Read why CMHA is calling for it. Click here

 

CMHA recognizes World Suicide Prevention Day 2020

CMHA joins the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (CASP) in inviting all individuals and communities to find a way to recognize and support World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD) on September 10th. It can be as simple as sending a message to those who are in despair, those who are grieving, and those who are supporting someone who is struggling with life’s challenges. By spreading the word that hope, help and healing are possible, we can work together to prevent suicide.

CASP estimates that each day in Canada, 10 people end their life and 200 make a suicide attempt. Suicide occurs across all age, economic, social, and ethnic boundaries.

Talking about suicide can provide relief and being a listener is the best intervention anyone can give. Here are a few ways you can help:

  • Take all threats or attempts seriously.
  • Be aware and learn warning signs of suicide.
  • Be direct and ask if the person is thinking of suicide. If the answer is yes, ask if the person has a plan and what the timeline is.
  • Be non-judgmental and empathetic.
  • Do not minimize the feelings expressed by the person.
  • Do not be sworn to secrecy…seek out the support of appropriate professionals.
  • Ask if there is anything you can do.

For more information or to learn more about the suicide prevention or positive mental health, visit CASP or contact CMHA Champlain East at 613-933-5845 or 1-800-493-8271.

 

Most Ontarians fear second wave of COVID-19, worries linked to actions of others: CMHA poll

A new poll shows an overwhelming majority of Ontarians (84 per cent) remain concerned about the possibility of a second wave of COVID-19, primarily driven by worry of other people not following the proper distancing rules as businesses and schools reopen.

The survey conducted by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Ontario Division indicates respondents are worried people are becoming too relaxed too quickly (83 per cent), about coming in contact with people who are not taking the proper precautions (78 per cent), and that others are not following physical distancing guidelines (84 per cent).

Additionally, 79 per cent fear the possibility of the province going back into lockdown if a second wave hits Ontario, and 85 per cent are concerned that a second wave will “put us back where we started.”

This data comes from the second of three polls Pollara Strategic Insights is conducting on behalf of CMHA Ontario. The first poll, released in May, showed a majority of Ontarians believe the province is headed for a mental health crisis.

CMHA Ontario is looking to evaluate how Ontarians’ perceptions of their mental health are changing as they come out from underneath the pandemic. One more survey in the coming months will measure perceptions of loosening restrictions and the province’s reopening.

Parents concerned amid back-to-school season

Poll results also indicated parents are particularly stressed about sending their children back to the classroom during the pandemic. Specifically:

  • More than six in 10 parents (64 per cent) are concerned about their own anxiety if their child is expected to go to school in September
  • Nearly eight in 10 worry about their child contracting COVID-19 at school (78 per cent) or bringing the virus into the household and infecting other people (79 per cent)
  • Six in 10 parents (61 per cent) are concerned physical distancing measures could have a negative impact on a child’s ability to learn
  • If schooled at home, more than six in 10 parents are concerned about their child’s motivation and productivity in the home environment (67 per cent), being able to provide educational support at home (64 per cent) and the ability of their child to learn at home (63 per cent)

Comparison: first poll versus second poll

While concerns around mental health in general remain high, results of CMHA Ontario’s second poll, when compared its first poll, indicated the negative impact of COVID-19 on mental health has slightly declined or remains unchanged. In particular:

  • In the first poll, most Ontarians (86 per cent) agreed the strain on mental health will worsen the longer the outbreak continues, which remains somewhat consistent through the second poll (83 per cent)
  • Two-thirds of Ontarians (66 per cent; down from 69 per cent) still believe once the outbreak is over, there may be a serious mental health crisis in the province
  • The vast majority of Ontarians (86 per cent; down from 87 per cent) remain worried about the impact of COVID-19 on the older generation
  • However, half (50 per cent) of Ontarians feel confident that they would be able to find mental health supports for themselves or family members if needed, a significant increase (up from 44 per cent)

Pollara’s online research of 1,002 Ontario adults was conducted from July 23 to Aug. 2. It carries a margin of error of ± 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Mental health and addictions supports have remained available through the pandemic at CMHA Champain East. Learn more at https://www.cmha-east.on.ca/index.php/en/our-services

 

CMHA Ontario COVID-19 Wave 2 Topline Summary

CMHA Ontario Wave 2

 

CMHA recognizes Recovery Month 2020

September is Recovery Month and CMHA Champlain East joins organizations around the world in recognizing this important event. According to Addictions & Mental Health Ontario (AMHO), 22 per cent of Canadians will be affected by addiction in their lifetime. Recovery Month gives them the opportunity to share stories, talk about treatment options, and reduce the stigma surrounding addiction.

Recovery looks different for everyone. We must continue to speak openly about addiction so those struggling know they are not alone. To show support, members of the public are encouraged to share their stories and use the #RecoveryMonth hashtag on social media.

If you or someone you know needs help, contact CMHA Champlain East at 613-933-5845 or 613-938-0435. For more information on Recovery Month, visit the Addictions & Mental Health Ontario website: amho.ca/recovery-month/

 

Back to school during COVID-19: Mental health tips for youth and parents

As students and parents prepare for back-to school-season amid a global pandemic, CMHA Champlain East is reminding everyone to keep mental health in mind during these unprecedented times. Students and parents are facing new challenges this school year due to COVID-19. Whether students take classes online or in class, the pressures remain the same.

CMHA suggests maintaining positive mental health with the following strategies:

  • Take care of your body. Mental and physical health are fundamentally linked. Make sure to get enough sleep, drink water, and eat well.
  • Build resiliency. Set aside time to think about the resiliency tools available to you, such as structured problem-solving skills or people who can help you during difficult situations.
  • Reach out for support. Social support is an important part of mental health. People in our networks can offer emotional support, practical help, and alternate points of view. Contact CMHA Champlain East for mental health support in your community.

Mental health supports for everyone, including children and youth, are also available. Here are a few organizations to consider:

 

CMHA’s 5th #MentalHealthForAll *virtual* conference takes place anywhere you are. Join us on Oct. 20 to learn, network and share ideas. Let’s hold out hope in an age of uncertainty. Learn more at www.conference.cmha.ca

MH4A EN

CMHA recognizes International Self-Care Day 2020

CMHA Champlain East joins individuals and organizations around the globe in celebrating International Self-Care Day on July 24, which aims to raise public awareness of the importance of self-care to stay healthy and prevent or delay illness.

Mental well-being is recognized as a pillar of self-care. Prioritizing self-care can increase resiliency, which can be helpful when faced with problems, stress, and other difficult situations. Many mental health programs provide strategies to improve resiliency skills like problem-solving, assertiveness, balancing obligations and expectations, and developing support networks.  

CMHA Ontario also offers BounceBack®, a free skill-building program that’s effective in helping people aged 15 and up who are experiencing mild-to-moderate anxiety or depression, or may be feeling low, stressed, worried, irritable or angry. This self-guided program offers telephone coaching, online videos and workbooks which you can do from the comfort of your home. Workbooks and coaching are available in multiple languages. For more information, visit bouncebackontario.ca/.

For more on International Self-Care Day and the seven pillars of self-care, visit the event website.

 

CMHA Champlain East presents annual awards for dedication, commitment to community mental health and addictions care

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(Cornwall, July 22, 2020) – Canadian Mental Health Association, Champlain East Branch is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of its annual awards for dedication and commitment to community mental health and addictions care.

Awarded annually since 1985 for “outstanding dedication in the field of mental health,” this year’s Earl Eaton Distinction Award has been presented to out-going CMHA board member Danielle Dorschner.

Dorschner has served eight years on the board of CMHA Champlain East, including a term as president during a significant management change. Over the years, her skills as a nurse and manager have proven invaluable to the organization. Dorschner has attended national and provincial CMHA conferences and brought what she learned from these events and her broader knowledge of the health care sector back to the organization.

“Danielle is smart, calm, caring, always prepared for meetings, and has great ideas,” said CMHA Champlain East board president Mally McGregor. “We couldn't count the number of hours she has dedicated to this organization, but we know it’s a huge number. The organization would not be where it is today without her.”

Instituted in 1995, CMHA Champlain East’s annual Mental Health Service Award recognizes “commitment and significant contributions made to the mental health movement in the community.” This year’s recipient is another out-going board member, Carleen Hickey.

Hickey has also served eight years on the board, including a term as president. She had a long career as a social worker in the community and brought her experiences of working with vulnerable individuals to her work with CMHA.

“Carleen’s refreshing sense of humour, openness to new ideas and tremendous dedication to CMHA Champlain East have long been welcomed and invaluable to our organization,” said McGregor. “Her passion and interest in supporting mental health promotion initiatives through fundraising events and advocating for funding will have a long-lasting impact on our branch and in our community.

“We’ll miss both Danielle and Carleen very much, and feel lucky to have gotten to know them and work with them at CMHA. Their contributions have made our branch an even better place to be” said executive director, Joanne Ledoux-Moshonas.

About Canadian Mental Health Association, Champlain East

Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Champlain East offers a range of programs and services designed to enhance the rehabilitation, recovery and independence of individuals living with a severe mental illness or concurrent disorders. Funding for branch programs and services is received by the Champlain Local Health Integration Network and the Ministry of Health. The branch has been designated under the French Language Services Act since 1991 and as such, is committed to providing services in both official languages (French and English).

For more information, contact:

Joanne Ledoux-Moshonas

Executive Director

Canadian Mental Health Association, Champlain East

T: 613-933-5845

E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  

News Release

Suicidal thoughts are on the rise. Now more than ever, Canada urgently needs a comprehensive, long-term #SuicidePrevention plan. Here’s why: Mental Health COVID Release

In the event that you may require immediate assistance in a time of crisis, please contact the Mental Health Crisis Line at 1-866-996-0991. They are available 24 hours per day.

 

New data says fewer Ontarians are seeking mental health supports during COVID-19, but services are helping those who use them

 

CMHA Champlain East, May 14, 2020 – As more details emerge about the psychological impact of COVID-19, CMHA Champlain East is encouraging anyone who is struggling with mental health and addictions issues at this time to reach out and seek help.

The call comes as new provincial data this week showed that far fewer people with a mental health condition have been seeking formal supports since the crisis began.

In the first of three polls by Pollara Strategic Insights on behalf of Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Ontario Division, only 13 per cent of Ontarians who identified as having a mental health condition said they’ve accessed mental health supports since the outbreak, compared to 39 per cent before the pandemic.

Further, nearly one-third (31 per cent) of those diagnosed with a mental health condition feel they do not have all the supports they need.

On the flipside, 77 per cent of those who have accessed mental health supports during the outbreak have found these supports to be helpful.

Also of interest is that 41 per cent of the general population in Ontario wish they had someone to talk to about the things that are worrying them now, and 43 per cent do not feel confident in their ability to find mental health supports.

“Our polling data suggests people don’t know where to find mental health and addictions resources or are just hesitant to reach out, but those who are reaching out and getting the help they need are being effectively supported,” said CMHA Champlain East Executive Director Joanne Ledoux-Moshonas.

“Despite the limitations that come with physical distancing and isolation, the CMHA has found ways to continue providing support to our clients. This may be in person with the appropriate safety precautions, by phone, videoconferencing or other means,” said the Executive Director. “Help is still available and CMHA is here with our programs and services.”

Looking ahead, the Pollara research shows that seven out of 10 Ontarians (69 per cent) believe the province is headed for a “serious mental health crisis” as it emerges from this pandemic and nearly eight of out 10 (77 per cent) say more mental health supports will be necessary to help society.

“In order to meet an upcoming mental health crisis coming out of COVID-19, community mental health agencies need increased investment from government,” Joanne Ledoux-Moshonas said “The province has promised $3.8 billion over 10 years for mental health and addictions service but the investment has been slow to materialize.”

Additional findings from the Pollara research about mental health and addictions:

  • While 43 per cent of Ontarians do not feel confident in their ability to find supports if they were needed, 44 per cent do.
  • The things we recommend to stay mentally healthy are taking a hit. For example, 36 per cent of Ontarians say their diet has gotten worse, while 48 per cent say exercise habits have worsened.
  • A quarter (23 per cent) of Ontarians are consuming more substances such as alcohol, tobacco or cannabis. Among those who are consuming these substances, 29 per cent have changed the time of day when they consume.
  • Despite trying to make a daily routine, 59 per cent are finding it hard to be productive while in self-isolation. This is true of those who are currently employed and those not working.
  • 29 per cent of those who have been diagnosed with a mental health condition say they’ve had issues accessing the supports they need during this time.

Pollara’s online research of 1,001 Ontario residents over 18 was conducted from April 16-23. It carries a margin of error of ± 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Two more surveys will follow in the coming months as restrictions loosen around COVID-19 and the economy continues to re-open during this unprecedented time. CMHA Ontario is looking to evaluate how Ontarians’ perceptions of their mental health are changing as they come out from the pandemic.

 

For more information, contact:

Joanne Ledoux-Moshonas

Executive Director

Canadian Mental Health Association, Champlain East

T: 613-933-5845

E : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

New data shows majority of Ontarians believe mental health crisis will follow COVID-19 impact

(Toronto, May 11, 2020) – Seven out of 10 Ontarians (69 per cent) believe the province is headed for a “serious mental health crisis” as it emerges from this pandemic and nearly eight out of 10 (77 per cent) say more mental health supports will be necessary to help society, according to new poll results released today.

This data comes from the first of three polls Pollara Strategic Insights is conducting on behalf of Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Ontario Division.

CMHA Ontario is looking to evaluate how Ontarians’ perceptions of their mental health are changing as they come out from underneath the pandemic. Two more surveys will follow in the coming months as restrictions loosen around COVID-19 and the economy continues to re-open.

Pollara’s research shows that 79 per cent of people in the province worry about what the future will look like after the outbreak is over, 87 per cent are worried about the impact on the older generation, and 71 per cent are worried about the younger generation.

Nearly everyone (90 per cent) is concerned about COVID-19’s impact on the economy and 69 per cent of Ontarians are concerned about the impact the outbreak has on their personal finances.

One finding of note is that while 67 per cent of Ontarians are worrying about the mental health impact on family and friends, fewer Ontarians – 53 per cent – are concerned about their own mental health.

“Stigma is likely playing a role in this self-reporting in that it’s much easier for Ontarians to admit concern for their physical health or for others than their own mental health,” said Camille Quenneville, CEO of CMHA Ontario.

“This may explain why, in spite of prevalent negative feelings, more people in Ontario express concern with their physical health [39 per cent] than those who express concern with their mental health [23 per cent],” she said.

“We look forward to the next phases of this research to gain a broader understanding of how the pandemic has affected our province and how we can best move forward to support Ontarians as they address mental health and addictions issues,” Quenneville said.

Pollara’s online research of 1,001 Ontario residents over 18 was conducted from April 16-23. It carries a margin of error of ± 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Additional findings:

  • Three-fifths (58 per cent) believe the mental health of themselves, those in their household (55 per cent) and friends and family outside their household (59 per cent) are negatively affected by the pandemic.  
  • People are more likely to feel their mental health (36 per cent) has worsened than their physical health (26 per cent) during the coronavirus outbreak.
  • A quarter (23 per cent) of Ontarians are consuming more substances such as alcohol, tobacco or cannabis. Among those who are consuming these substances, 29 per cent have changed the time of day when they consume.
  • The things we recommend to stay mentally healthy are taking a hit. For example, 36 per cent of Ontarians say their diet has gotten worse, while 48 per cent say exercise habits have worsened.
  • Despite trying to make a daily routine, 59 per cent are finding it hard to be productive while in self-isolation. This is true of those who are currently employed and those not working.
  • Eight per cent have had to deal with themselves or friends and family members testing positive, or losing a friend or friend or family member to the virus.
  • 69 per cent of Ontarians are concerned about catching the virus, while 70 per cent are concerned about losing family or friends to COVID-19.
  • 40 per cent of respondents or an immediate family member have lost work hours or pay while nearly a third (28 per cent) have been laid off.
  • 65 per cent are concerned about the impact on students’ education.

About Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario

Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Ontario is a not-for-profit, charitable organization. We work to improve the lives of all Ontarians through leadership, collaboration and continual pursuit of excellence in community-based mental health and addictions services. Our vision is a society that embraces and invests in the mental health of all people. We are a trusted advisor to government, contributing to health systems development through policy formulation and recommendations that promote positive mental health. Our 28 local CMHA branches, together with community-based mental health and addictions service providers across the province, serve approximately 500,000 Ontarians each year.

 

For more information, contact your local CMHA branch or:

Justin Dickie

Communications Officer

Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario

T: 416-977-5580, ext. 4175

E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Join CMHA’s #SignsofSupport campaign to spread positivity, encouragement amid COVID-19

Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) branches across Ontario are encouraging their local communities to share positive messages of support for one another through the #SignsofSupport social media campaign as a way to keep spirits high amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Initiated by CMHA York and South Simcoe Branch, #SignsofSupport started with that branch’s staff members holding pictures filled with messages of encouragement to help others through this difficult time.

 

Now, CMHA Champlain East is looking to our community to help spread positivity. Here are the steps to create your Sign of Support:

  1. Print out these templates or use a blank sheet of paper to write a message of hope or a tip for the public to help them through this difficult time. If you are using a blank sheet of paper, write #SignsofSupport on the bottom right hand corner.
  1. Take a picture of yourself holding the sign.
  1. Share the picture on social media and tag us on https://www.facebook.com/cmhaeast/ Feel free to share your message on as many channels as you wish.
  1. Encourage your friends to participate and keep checking back for more signs of support!

Let’s build each other up during this difficult time by sharing positive messages of encouragement and connection on social media. Every photo matters!

  

Update on our services EN Bannr Web

Important notice regarding CMHA Champlain East

Last updated: March 25, 2020

CMHA Champlain East deemed essential service; providing community supports in different ways

Deemed an essential service by the Ontario government amid public health concerns related to COVID-19, Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Champlain East remains open and is ensuring community mental health and addictions supports are safely available by providing programs, services and information to our clients over the phone as this situation develops.

In accordance with social distancing measures outlined by public health agencies, CMHA Champlain East has recently altered service delivery to protect public health and safety, pivoting services and information sharing to virtual or other means so individuals in need of mental health and addictions supports can continue to get the help they need.

To protect clients and staff while continuing to support the community, CMHA Champlain East is providing the following services by phone to our clients until further notice:

    • Intensive Case Management Supports
    • Resource Center Supports
    • All educational presentations/trainings have been suspended.
    • The Resource Centers (Strabright, Oasis and Horizon) will remain closed.

If you or someone you know is struggling, please contact CMHA Champlain East 1-800-493-8271 to find out about virtual and phone-based support services there to help you.

 

Resources

Special webinar series on mental wellness, COVID-19 links, news releases and resources click here: https://www.cmha-east.on.ca/index.php/en/mental-health/coping-with-covid-19

  

If you feel you are experiencing symptoms of the Coronavirus please contact:

-       Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 or;

-       The Eastern Ontario Health Unit at 1-800-267-7120